Headliners

 

 

Bingo seat gets eight women pregnant

 

 

Women workers in a Bristol bingo hall are refusing to sit in a seat, which appears to
have made a quarter of the workforce pregnant.


Eight women have become pregnant after sitting on the chair at the Gala Bingo Hall
in Bristol. But others have pledged not to rest their bums there for fear the story is true.


Gala press officer Helen Hutt told Ananova: "We've had some customers asking to sit
in the seat just because they think it's lucky, but as yet we've had no one wanting to sit
in it because they're desperate to get pregnant.


"One or two of the staff have said 'I'm definitely not sitting there' because they don't
want to end up getting pregnant." She added: "About one in four of the staff hav
become pregnant, so it's quite a high percentage
."

 

 

Bingo-winner ordered to share £94,000 with her mother

 

 

A woman who scooped a bingo jackpot of £94,000 has been ordered by a court to pay
her mother more than half her winnings.

Liverpool County Court heard how Christine Long went back on an agreement
o split the cash with her mother Patricia Woosey.

Mrs Woosey, of Walton, Liverpool, has not spoken to her daughter for more than
two years after she refused to fulfil her promise.

Awarding Mrs Woosey more than £55,000 in damages, Judge David Mackay said
it was a "very sad state of affairs" which had caused both women "considerable unhappiness."

Her husband, William, 65, who walks with the aid of a stick, said after the hearing
"nobody won".

The court was told that both women went to the Mecca Bingo Hall in Breck Road,
Anfield, in October 1998 where they had been on several occasions.

They had split winnings before and had an agreement to "go 50-50" on anything
over £20, the court heard.

Mrs Woosey's barrister, David Bennett, said when 39-year-old Mrs Long, of
Suburban Road, Anfield, won £94,091
She offered her mother half the money immediately and repeated the offer
twice more in the car on the way home.

 

 

He's not dead, he's playing bingo

 

 

An Alaskan woman was told her brother was dead, only to discover after half
a day of mourning him he was alive and well.

Police told her brother Neil Beaton had been found dead in an alley in Anchorage
Lauretta MacBeth at 1 a.m. her brother Neil Beaton had been found dead in an
alley Anchorage.

The body was mis-identified because Neil Beaton's wallet was found on the dead
man - he had lost it a week before.

"I was shouting: 'I can't believe this! What do you mean you found him?'
Mrs MacBeth began telephoning relatives to tell them of Neil's death.
She lit a candle for him and planned his funeral with other family members.

Her brother John said: "My brother died face down in an alley - the first thing
thought of is did I tell him I loved him the last time I saw him?
I did, so that helped a little."

Mrs Macbeth told the Anchorage Daily News the family grieved together for hours.
"We were on the phone, giving each other spiritual advice, the things we could
have done differently."
Bingo 'more exciting than bungee jumping'
Bingo is more exciting than bungee jumping or watching naked lap dancers,
according to research.

The National Bingo Game Association tested the reactions of a dozen young
male thrill seekers.
They found that bingo set their pulses racing faster than strippers or extreme sports.
Heart monitors showed the men's pulses rose higher the nearer they came to
winning a major bingo prize.
With just one number left to complete on the card, their heart rates were racing
faster than when poised to leap from the bungee platform.
Just before the bungee jump, the average heart rate rose from around 60 to 138
beats per minute.
In the lap-dancing club it hovered around 88.
But with only one number still to complete on their bingo card their heart rates
soared to an average 141 beats per minute.
The National Bingo Game Association tested the reactions of a dozen young
male thrill seekers.
They found that bingo set their pulses racing faster than strippers or
extreme sports.
Heart monitors showed the men's pulses rose higher the nearer they came to
winning a major bingo prize.
With just one number left to complete on the card, their heart rates were racing
faster than when poised to leap from the bungee platform.
Just before the bungee jump, the average heart rate rose from around 60 to 138
beats per minute.
In the lap-dancing club it hovered around 88.
But with only one number still to complete on their bingo card their heart rates
soared to an average 141 beats per minute.

Sports psychologist Lee Ashworth told Ananova: "Many of these guys were
base jumpers who spend their free time parachuting from high buildings,
so they are well used to taking big risks.
Yet even these adrenalins junkies found the excitement of waiting to see if
their winning number would come up almost too much to bear."
Welsh Bingo Players

WALES – June 27, 2001 – As reported by the BBC: ``Magistrates have heard how
a gambling grandmother stole from her friends to feed her addiction to bingo.

``Myrna Flynn, 62, of Trowbridge, Cardiff, was hooked on the game and visited
her local bingo hall 146 times in just nine months - virtually every other day.

``But Flynn's number was finally up when she stole £2,900 after organising a trip
to the seaside for 19 friends.

``…She admitted theft and was given a community rehabilitation order.
She was ordered to pay £2,900 compensation and costs of £55…"

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